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IEA: Global Power Generation From Non-Fossil Sources Has Decreased Over Last 20 Years

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International Energy Agency

Over the past two decades, the global share of power generation from non-fossil sources has decreased from 37% (in 1990) to 33% (in 2010); in contrast, the share of coal-fired power generation has risen from 37% to 42%.

International Energy Agency: Resources to Reserves 2013 – Executive Summary 

Fossil fuels currently meet 80% of global energy demand. Even if current policy commitments and pledges made by countries to tackle climate change and other energy-related challenges were to be put in place, global energy demand in 2035 is projected to rise by 40% – with fossil fuels still contributing 75%. Demand over the coming decades will stem mainly from energy needs of emerging markets such as China and India. The use of coal, gas and oil to fuel the power, industry, buildings and transport sectors is set to rise. Although environmental concerns have led to a significant increase in lower-carbon options, these are not yet deployed widely enough to meet current of future demand for energy. Over the past two decades, the global share of power generation from non-fossil sources has decreased from 37% (in 1990) to 33% (in 2010); in contrast, the share of coal-fired power generation has risen from 37% to 42%. Fossil fuels will continue to provide the majority of global energy needs for the foreseeable future, but are there sufficient resources to meet the demand?

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