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No Climate For Change: How Scott Morrison Used Labor’s Green Policies Against Them

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Daily Mail

Former Australian Prime Minister John Howard said Labor’s stance on climate had cost them the election.

Scott Morrison’s ‘miracle’ election win has been cheered by US conservatives and compared to Donald Trump’s surprise 2016 presidential win.

The Coalition won despite 55 Newspolls in a row predicting they would lose – echoing how the US president rose to power against pollsters’ predictions in 2016.

The Liberal campaign had emphasised the cost of Labor’s climate change policies – which included reducing carbon emissions by 45 per cent by 2030.

And while Labor campaigned against the controversial Adani mine, the Coalition  focused on the jobs boost of the new development.

On Saturday night, former Australian Prime Minister John Howard said Labor’s stance on climate had cost them the election.

After Bill Shorten failed to secure votes in Queensland the Liberal Party elder said Labor did not reassure voters about job security. 

‘When they saw a Labor Party prepared to destroy jobs in the name of climate ideology in relation to the Adani min, they said “That’s not for Queensland”‘, he said.

Scott Morrison’s ‘miracle’ election win has been cheered by US conservatives and compared to Donald Trump’s surprise 2016 presidential win

On Sunday morning American TV news channel Fox News labelled Mr Morrison’s win as ‘a stunning victory’. 

American political activist Pamela Geller meanwhile trumpeted ‘the people are taking back their countries from the totalitarian left’.

‘Climate advocates had said this election would be a referendum on the current leadership’s positions on climate change,’ Ms Harder wrote.

‘The results suggest that either voters don’t care as much about the issue compared to others or they prefer less aggressive measures, as the current leadership is pursuing.’ 

The New York Times described how ‘the conservative victory also adds Australia to a growing list of countries that have shifted rightward through the politics of grievance, including Brazil, Hungary and Italy. 

‘Mr Morrison’s pitch mixed smiles and scaremongering, warning older voters and rural voters in particular that a government of the left would leave them behind and favour condescending elites.’ 

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