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UN Climate Talks Stumble, Deeply Divided Over $100 Climate Billions

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Marlowe Hood, AFP

Climate negotiators divided on how to tackle global warming—and who should foot the bill—grappled Friday on the final day of crunch talks to finalise a draft agreement ahead of a crucial UN summit.

After four days of haggling in the German city of Bonn, this is the final negotiating day before heads of state and government arrive in Paris for a November 30-December 11 conference tasked with sealing the deal.

A deep divide between rich and developing nations, and a botched attempt to streamline procedure, have left many diplomats frustrated.

Representing the G77 group of more than 130 developing nations, South Africa’s climate negotiator Nozipho Mxakato-Diseko expressed the bloc’s “profound dissatisfaction” at a meeting on Friday morning.

“You cannot wish the Group away, we are not an inconvenience to be ignored,” she told the two facilitators of the 195-nation talks.

“G77 and China will not be sidelined.”

Analysts said there has been little progress at the key talks.

A draft text, after last-minute additions by many countries, “contains a lot of substance,” said Martin Kaiser, head of international climate politics for Greenpeace International. “But process-wise it’s a nightmare.”

Deletions and insertions into the draft have “delayed the process for several days if not the entire week,” he added. […]

Money, said negotiators and observers, remains the most obstinate hurdle.

A promise made at a tumultuous 2009 climate summit in Copenhagen to provide $100 billion (90 billion euros) in annual assistance to developing nations from 2020 was devoid of detail.

How much will be for curbing emissions and how much for boosting resilience? Can the money be from grants or loans, or the private sector? All these points remain undecided.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-10-climate-stumble-paris-summit-looms.html#jCp

Money, said negotiators and observers, remains the most obstinate hurdle.

A promise made at a tumultuous 2009 climate summit in Copenhagen to provide $100 billion (90 billion euros) in annual assistance to developing nations from 2020 was devoid of detail.

How much will be for curbing emissions and how much for boosting resilience? Can the money be from grants or loans, or the private sector? All these points remain undecided.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-10-climate-stumble-paris-summit-looms.html#jCp

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